Voting is now open for the Rodney Huddleston Prize

Rodney Huddleston Prize

In its fourth year of being presented, the annual Rodney Huddleston Prize is awarded to the best paper published in the previous year of the Australian Journal of Linguistics as judged by the members of the Australian Linguistics Society. 

The $1,000 cash prize is generously funded by Taylor and Francis, the publishers of AJL, and is named after AJL’s first editor, Rodney Huddleston, who edited the journal from 1979-1985. 

The winner will be announced at the ALS Annual General Meeting on Thursday, 9 December 2021.

To cast your vote 

1.     Click on the link https://als.asn.au/MemberGateway 

2.     Use your login name and password to access the online member portal. If you have forgotten either, please click on "Forgotten your username or password?". 

3.     After login, click on the "Votes" tab.  

4.     The papers in Vol 40, 2020 of the Australian Journal of Linguistics are listed here; to access the abstract for a paper click on the paper title.

5.     To cast your vote for the best paper please click the button in the column to the left of your selected paper and then submit your vote using the button at the bottom of the page.

Voting close at 14.00 on Thursday, 9 December 2021. (Australian Eastern Standard Time)

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2021 Research Grant awardees and scholarship winners announced

2021 Research Grant awardees and scholarship winners announced

The 2021 scholarship winners and ALS research grant scheme awardees have now been announced.

The Gerhardt Laves Scholarship to support linguistic fieldwork in Australia and the region by a research student has been awarded to Caroline de Dear (Macquarie) for her project Questions and responses in Gija conversations.

The Jalwang Scholarship for supporting linguists to give back to the community by converting research into materials of benefit to the language speakers has been awarded to Alex Anderson (University of Sydney) for The Gudjal Project.

This years' Susan Kaldor Scholarship to assist students to attend an institute, summer school or similar intensive course has been jointly won by Agnieszka Faron (University of Queensland) to attend the International Summer School on Multilingualism at The University of Greenwich and Eleanor Yacopetti (University of Western Australia) to participate in the Bininj Kunwok Language Course.

This years' Research Grants scheme has funded four projects:

Yanping Li (Western Sydney University) has been awarded a grant for the project Native English Speakers’ Learning of Mandarin Tones in Regionally-accented Mandarin Words.

Haoyi Li (ANU) was funded for the project Multimodal Metaphors: the semantics and syntax of tropes in the language and art of Ganalbingu (Djinba).

Thomas Saunders and Sarah Laborde (Griffith) received a grant for the Big Nyikina repatriation of audio and video recordings.

Hanna Torsh (Macquarie) has been awarded a grant for the project Pride and shame ten years on: Revisiting linguistic identity and family language policy.

The ALS executive congratulates all the awardees and grantees.

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2021 Michael Clyne Prize winner announced

2021 Michael Clyne Prize winner announced

The winner of the 2021 Michael Clyne Prize has been announced. This year's Prize has been awarded to Levi Durbidge for the Monash University thesis Study abroad in multilingual contexts: The linguistic investment and development of Japanese adolescents in and beyond year-long exchange programs. Congratulations Dr Durbidge.

Thesis summary:

Growing populations of students migrating temporarily for academic purposes has led to an urgency in better understanding questions of language contact and learning faced by these populations. However, an ongoing focus on students departing from, or hosted at, higher education institutions in Anglophone countries limits this understanding. Additionally, there is now a recognised need for research which approaches these questions holistically, viewing the individual as a situated and agentive participant in wider transnational and sociocultural environments.

Drawing on Ecological Systems Theory and The Douglas Fir Group’s (2016) Transdisciplinary Framework for SLA in a Multilingual World, this thesis makes visible the complex interrelations between the individual, context and linguistic development as national, linguistic and cultural borders are crossed. The project examines the experiences of 100 Japanese high school students during and after a year embedded in families and schools abroad in countries across Europe, Asia and North and South America, investigating their language development and learning ecologies they encountered. Innovating a methodology that used quantitative survey data to map the representativeness of qualitative interview respondents, multiple cases were selected for intensive thematic and narrative analysis which explored the similarities and particularities of respondent experiences. Examining the complexities of language learning ecologies across a variety of multilingual and heteroglossic settings revealed a diverse and dynamic range of intertwined factors which affected informants’ linguistic development. Significantly, the thesis identified the importance of specific, ‘key individuals’, such as host mothers and peers at school, in providing affective, instrumental and embedded support in shaping informants’ investment in host language practices. Local migrant communities also emerged as pivotal in cases where informants experienced discrimination and marginalisation on account of their minority status. Digital communication technology was crucial in mediating participation in host peer communities, concomitantly facilitating the development of teenage linguistic repertoires and integration into these communities. Technology also offered affordances for strategic language learning that allowed informants to negotiate participation and belonging in environments where multilingual competencies were required to move between communities. The results also underscored the longer-term importance of home community and individual agency in the maintenance of these competencies after returning. Informants found their international experience could be a source of othering in the schools they returned to in Japan, while their multilingual competencies were often unvalued. Combined with exam performance pressures, desire to invest in host language practices often diminished significantly in the year after returning.

Overall, the thesis is noteworthy for its ecological treatment of host and home environments, accentuating the complex, intertwined individual and social factors which affect the experiences of short-term academic migrants. Understanding the entanglement of these factors is crucial to promoting belonging and investment among those entering new communities and highlighting the need for multilingual and transcultural competence to be valued if that investment is to be maintained.

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2021 Research Grants, Scholarships and Clyne Prize now open

2021 Research Grants, Scholarships and Clyne Prize now open

ALS is delighted to announce that the 2021 Research Grants scheme, Gerhardt Laves Scholarship, Susan Kaldor Scholarship, Jalwang Scholarship, and Michael Clyne Prize are now open to applications. Applications for all schemes close on 5 May 2021.

The Research Grants scheme offers grants of up to $5,000 for research in any area of linguistics, and funds approximately six projects per year. The Michael Clyne Prize (awarded jointly with the Applied Linguistics Association of Australia) is awarded for the best postgraduate research thesis in immigrant bilingualism and language contact. The Jalwang Scholarship supports linguists to give back to the community by converting some of their research into materials of benefit to the language community. The Gerhardt Laves Scholarship contributes to fieldwork expenses for postgraduate student researchers in Indigenous languages of Australia or its immediate region. The Susan Kaldor Scholarship supports ALS student members to participate in an international summer school or institute.

Further details and application process are under the funding and support tab.

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2020 Rodney Huddleston Award announced

The 2020 winner of the $1,000 Rodney Huddleston Prize is Elena Sheard for her article ‘Variation, Language Ideologies and Stereotypes: Orientations towards like and youse in Western and Northern Sydney’ AJL 39(4), 485-510.

This prize is awarded annually to the best paper published in the previous year of the Australian Journal of Linguistics as judged by the members of the Australian Linguistics Society. It is generously funded by Taylor and Francis, the publishers of AJL, and is named after the journal’s first editor, Rodney Huddleston.

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2020 Rodney Huddleston Prize is Open

Rodney Huddleston Prize

In its third year of being presented, the annual Rodney Huddleston Prize is awarded to the best paper published in the previous year of the Australian Journal of Linguistics as judged by the members of the Australian Linguistics Society. The $1,000 cash prize is generously funded by Taylor and Francis, the publishers of AJL, and is named after AJL’s first editor, Rodney Huddleston, who edited the journal from 1979-1985. The winner will be announced at the ALS Annual General Meeting on Tuesday, 15 December 2020.

The papers in Vol 39, 2019 of the Australian Journal of Linguistics are listed below; to access the abstract for a paper click on the paper title.

To cast your vote 

1.     Click on the link https://als.asn.au/MemberGateway 

2.     Use your login name and password to access the online member portal. If you have forgotten either, please click on "Forgotten your username or password?". 

3.     After login, click on the "Votes" tab.  

4.     The papers in Vol 40, 2019 of the Australian Journal of Linguistics are listed here; to access the abstract for a paper click on the paper title.

5.     To cast your vote for the best paper please click the button in the column to the left of your selected paper and then submit your vote using the button at the bottom of the page.

Read more

MIchael Clyne Prize 2020 awarded

Michael Clyne Prize Awarded

The 2020 Michael Clyne Prize has been award. This year's prize has been awarded to Lisa Gilanyi (University of New South Wales) for her thesis Transnational sojourners' investment in learning English: a multi-case study of partners of international students in Australia.

This year’s field of applicants for the Michael Clyne Prize was particularly strong, reflecting the high quality of research being carried out in this area at the postgraduate level, and the panel was faced with a very difficult decision in choosing the successful applicant. Congratulations Dr Gilanyi!

Thesis summary and main findings:

Although language contact and learning have been explored extensively in permanent migration contexts in Australia, scant attention has been given to how short-term migrants, referred to in this thesis as transnational sojourners, grapple with acquiring the language of their temporary homeland. In particular, very little is known about the language learning behaviour of the many thousands of partners of international students who arrive in Australia each year, intending to return to their home countries at the conclusion of their partners’ studies.

Despite living in contact with English for the duration of their sojourns in Australia, the extent to which partners of international students are able to engage in learning English is often impacted by limited access to learning opportunities, and their hopes of becoming bilingual may prove illusory. On the other hand, some partners of international students, and other transnational sojourners, may be ambivalent about learning English if they do not perceive it to have long-term usefulness when they return to their home countries. This ambivalence may be further compounded by the existence of strong expatriate networks that allow them to work and socialise in their first language while in Australia.

This thesis used a longitudinal, multi-case study design to explore the migration experiences and language learning of partners of international students in Australia in order to understand the factors that impacted on their investment in learning English (Darvin & Norton, 2015). Using a narrative inquiry methodology, data was generated through multiple interviews with seven partners of international students living in Australia and analysed using a multi-layered approach that drew on both “narrative analysis” and “analysis of narrative” (Polkinghorne, 1995).

The study found that, although each of the participants in the study professed a desire to improve their English, few engaged in activities to achieve this. Several factors were identified as contributing to their apparent lack of investment, including: the temporary nature of their migration; the fact that their migration and investment decisions were made as part of a family unit; the embodied nature of the participants’ identities; the way they viewed their existing linguistic resources; and the reality that their investment choices were made in the context of limited resources and a restricted timeframe.

The study contributes valuable empirical data that illuminates the language learning experiences of temporary migrants, and in particular partners of international students in Australia. It highlights the many differences between the way temporary and permanent migrants’ experience and respond to their contact with English in Australia. The findings provide important insights for policy makers and English language educators in Australia, as they seek to understand and meet the language needs of partners of international students or other temporary migrants.

References

Darvin, R., & Norton, B. (2015). Identity and a model of investment in applied linguistics. Annual Review of Applied Linguistics, 35, 36-56. doi:10.1017/S0267190514000191
Polkinghorne, D. E. (1995). Narrative configuration in qualitative analysis. International Journal of Qualitative Studies in Education, 8(1), 5-23. doi:10.1080/0951839950080103

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MIchael Clyne Prize 2020 now open

Michael Clyne Prize 2020

The 2020 Michael Clyne Prize for the best 2019 PhD thesis with a focus on any aspect of immigrant bilingualism and language contact is now open. Please apply online under the support and funding tab. Applications close on 26 June and results will be announced on 24 July.

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ALS Research Grants and Scholarships deferred

ALS Research Grants and Scholarships deferred

Due to the current COVID19 pandemic, travel to fieldsites, summer schools and conferences is not possible. The ALS executive has decided to postpone opening the 2020 Research Grants scheme, along with the Laves, Kaldor and Jalwang Scholarships, until later in the year. We will make another announcement once the situation stabilizes. (The Clyne Prize will proceed as normal and will be advertised soon.)

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2019 Rodney Huddleston Award announced

2019 Rodney Huddleston Award announced

The 2019 winner of the $1,000 Rodney Huddleston Prize is Helen Fraser for her article ‘Forensic Transcription: How Confident False Beliefs about Language and Speech Threaten the Right to a Fair Trial in Australia’ AJL 38(4), 586-606.

This prize is awarded annually to the best paper published in the previous year of the Australian Journal of Linguistics as judged by the members of the Australian Linguistics Society. It is generously funded by Taylor and Francis, the publishers of AJL, and is named after the journal’s first editor, Rodney Huddleston.

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