ALS 2024 Plenary Speakers

David Britain

David Britain

Talk Title: Turbulent times:  acentury of linguistic change in Falkland Island English

David Britain has been Professor of Modern English Linguistics at the University of Bern in Switzerland since 2010, having previously worked in New Zealand and the UK. His research interests embrace language variation and change, varieties of English (especially in Southern England, the Southern Hemisphere and the Pacific), dialect contact and attrition, dialect ideologies, and the dialectology-human geography interface, especially with respect to space/place, urban/rural and the role of mobilities. He is co-author (with Laura Rupp) of Linguistic perspectives on a variable English morpheme: let’s talk about –s (Palgrave, 2019), editor of Language in the British Isles (Cambridge University Press, 2007), co-editor (with Jenny Cheshire) of Social Dialectology (Benjamin, 2003), and co-author of Linguistics: an Introduction (with Andrew Radford, Martin Atkinson, Harald Clahsen and Andrew Spencer) (Cambridge University Press, 2nd edition 2009). David was Associate Editor of the Journal of Sociolinguistics between 2008 and 2017. 

Keynote abstract: TBA

 

Virginia Yip

Virginia Yip

Talk Title: TBA

Virginia Yip received her BA in Linguistics from the University of Texas at Austin and PhD in Linguistics from the University of Southern California. She is Professor of Linguistics in the Department of Linguistics and Modern Languages and Director of the Childhood Bilingualism Research Centre and Chinese University of Hong Kong - Peking University Joint Research Centre for Language and Human Complexity. Her research interests include early child language development, language and cognitive development, bilingualism, bilingual acquisition, second language acquisition, Cantonese, Mandarin and comparative Chinese grammar, psycholinguistics and cognitive neuroscience. The monograph The Bilingual Child: Early Development and Language Contact, co-authored with Stephen Matthews (Cambridge University Press) received the Linguistic Society of America’s Leonard Bloomfield Book Award.

Keynote abstract: TBA

 

 

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